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The 2015 Arctic Inspiration Prize (AIP) Awards Ceremony was held at the end of January at the Shaw Centre in Ottawa, Ontario, in conjunction with the Northern lights 2016 Business and Cultural Showcase.

Hosted by Peter Mansbridge, the ceremony featured an exhilarating performance by northern artists Tanya Tagaq, laakkuluk Williamson Bathory, Christine Duncan and members of Nunavut Sivuniksavut.

BHENY members receive their share of the Arctic Inspiration Prize from Governor General of Canada David Johnston. © Fred Cattroll/ArcticNet (3)
BHENY members receive their share of the Arctic Inspiration Prize from Governor General of Canada David Johnston. © Fred Cattroll/ArcticNet (3)

The three winning projects are: Better hearing in Education for Northern youth (BHENY), Qaggiq: Nurturing the Arctic Performing Arts, and the Tri-Territorial recreation Training (TRT) Project. They share $1.5M in prize money, an increase in the annual amount of $1M due to increased funding from prize partners.

BHENY received $300,000 to install amplification systems in every school in each of the 13 communities in Nunavut’s Qikiqtani region.

Members of the Tri-Territorial Recreation Training (TRT) Project claim their $600,000 portion of the $1.5M AIP monies.
Members of the Tri-Territorial Recreation Training (TRT) Project claim their $600,000 portion of the $1.5M AIP monies.

Qaggiq received $600,000 to help create mentorships, collaborations and teaching opportunities to connect circumpolar artists. The prize will also provide funds for a performing arts space to showcase and train northern talent. Nunavut is the only jurisdiction in Canada that does not have a performing arts centre.

The Tri-Territorial recreation Training project also received $600,000 to train future leaders across the North in recreational programming.