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May/June 2011

Again, this year, under extreme weather conditions, a large team of scientists and explorers from Canada, the US and the UK, are conducting ice and oceanographic experiments in Canada’s High Arctic to better understand the effects of climate change in the North.

The Catlin Arctic Survey began its work in 2009; that year studying the polar ice-cap ice surface to collect data that would help form projections on how long Arctic Ocean ice would remain a year-round polar feature. In 2010 the team studied levels of acidification present in northern polar waters to better understand climate change impacts on the biology of the Arctic food chain.

Their objectives in 2011 involve gathering crucial on-site scientific data at their High Arctic base camp on Ellef Ringnes Island (78º 37’N) in the Qikiqtaaluk Region of the Canadian Arctic Archipelago. The Survey is also conducting challenging exploratory team treks across the floating sea ice to study changes in ocean currents.

For more information, see Catlin Arctic Survey’s website and blog at: www.catlinarcticsurvey.com with photos, detailed information and progress reports.