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Norway is recognized globally as a progressive, well-adapted, successful Arctic nation. And, as Norwegians are fond of telling, from an historical point of view at least, many of their famed polar exploration heroes, most notably Roald Amundsen (amongst others) attributed their polar exploration successes, in part, to what they had learned from the Inuit. Today, Norway’s ties to Inuit have never been stronger.

Inuit of course are traditional experts on the subject of ice — able to understand its very essence and many forms, however, this past February, in Ottawa and Iqaluit, Nunavut, it was the Norwegian turn to demonstrate to Inuit and southern Canadians some very new, nevertheless fascinating properties of ice.

Playing “recognizable” but very different musical instruments (ice harps, ice drums, ice horns) hand-fashioned from blocks of ice using a chainsaw and knives, each and everyone of Isungset’s Ice Music performances are coolly unpredictable, entirely dependent upon the type of ice available at each venue and ambient temperatures at performance time.

After performing at the capital’s Winterlude festivities, the innovative Norwegian composer-musician and his group travelled North to treat Nunavummiut to his rarified brand of music.

Isungset and collaborating musicians reveal their cool daring and creative energy around the world for all to see and hear. To view and hear Ice Music in action visit: http://isung.no/ice/video/.

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